Yesterday, Judge Schofield ruled that a claim for declaratory relief to prevent the White House and President Donald Trump from revoking or threatening to revoke White House press credentials could proceed.  The case was brought by PEN America Center, a nonprofit of association of media professionals, claiming that these threats chilled First Amendment rights for journalists (specifically CNN’s Jim Acosta) and also prevented PEN and its members from receiving information that would have been provided to the organization by these journalists.

The order found that the “Press Corps” claim, seeking declaratory relief on First Amendment grounds to prevent the White House from arbitrarily revoking press credentials, was properly pled:
Continue Reading Judge Schofield: Claims Over White House Revocation of Press Credentials and Security Clearances May Proceed

Two complaints filed this week presented putative class action claims on behalf of former campaign field organizers hired by former New York City mayor and presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg.  The first complaint claims that the staffers were promised employment through the November 2020 presidential election (even if Bloomberg dropped out of the race), but were then terminated shortly after the March 4, 2020 “Super Tuesday” primaries.

The second complaint describes the situation as follows:
Continue Reading Bloomberg 2020 Campaign Staffers Seek Promised Compensation in New Complaints

In an opinion Friday, Judge Schofield dismissed a RICO complaint alleging that “North Korean hackers stole $101 million from Plaintiff Bangladesh Bank’s New York Federal Reserve account and then transferred and dispersed the money to Defendants’ bank accounts and casinos in the Philippines.”

The central flaw was the lack of a “pattern” of racketeering activity

In a decision July 24, Judge Schofield dismissed civil RICO claims against the Trump Organization and Trump family members, while allowing the remaining putative class claims to proceed.  The case (see our previous coverage here) alleged that Donald J. Trump, the Trump Organization, and members of the Trump family falsely promoted the multi-level-marketing scheme ACN, reaping millions of dollars in secret payments to promote the scheme that led to would-be entrepreneurs losing millions of dollars.

Continue Reading Judge Schofield Trims Claims in Multi-Level Marketing Scheme Class Action Against Trump Organization

In an opinion yesterday, Judge Schofield dismissed a  case brought purportedly on behalf of various ERISA benefit plans against banks accused of fixing prices in the FX markets.  Judge Schofield ruled that the banks could not be sued under ERISA because they were not fiduciaries to the plans or even “functional” fiduciaries, but were instead

Last week, Judge Schofield granted U.S. Airways’ motion to reinstate their claim for $70 million in damages ($210 million when trebled under antitrust laws) as part of a third amended complaint in an antitrust action over online booking fees.  Sabre, a global distribution system operator used by travel agents to book flights on multiple airlines, argued that U.S. Airways had already waived the claims in its second amended complaint in an attempt to secure a bench trial and that reinstatement was improper and would prejudice Sabre.  Judge Schofield rejected these arguments, noting that U.S. Airways’ revocation of its waiver did not change the claims at issue (only the damages) and thus amendment was still proper under Rules 15 and 16.

Continue Reading Judge Schofield Allows U.S. Airways to Restore Damages Claim in Antitrust Case Despite Previous Waiver

In an opinion yesterday, Judge Schofield denied various banks’ motion to dismiss a price fixing case concerning a foreign exchange benchmark called the “Fix.” Notably, Judge Schofield distinguished her ruling from Judge Buchwald’s ruling dismissing a similar case concerning the LIBOR benchmark (covered here).  Judge Buchwald had ruled there could be no “antitrust injury” because LIBOR is set by banks acting “cooperative[ly]” (as opposed to acting as competitors) to estimate their borrowing costs, whereas, as Judge Schofield pointed out, banks establish the Fix by actual transactions. Judge Schofield went on to disagree with the LIBOR ruling, to the extent it could be read to require a showing, at the pleading stage, that the injury alleged could not have resulted from unilateral (as opposed to collusive) conduct:
Continue Reading In Allowing Foreign Exchange Price-Fixing Case to Proceed, Judge Schofield Disagrees With Judge Buchwald’s LIBOR Ruling

A few minutes ago, suspended Yankee third baseman Alex Rodriguez voluntarily dismissed his suit against Major League Baseball alleging that it tortiously interfered with his Yankee contract through improper methods of investigating his alleged use of performance enhancing drugs, and also voluntarily dismissed a second suit challenging his resulting suspension.  The two notices are here