Two complaints filed this week presented putative class action claims on behalf of former campaign field organizers hired by former New York City mayor and presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg.  The first complaint claims that the staffers were promised employment through the November 2020 presidential election (even if Bloomberg dropped out of the race), but were then terminated shortly after the March 4, 2020 “Super Tuesday” primaries.

The second complaint describes the situation as follows:
Continue Reading Bloomberg 2020 Campaign Staffers Seek Promised Compensation in New Complaints

In two opinions yesterday (here and here), Judges Furman and Carter concluded that Due Process requires timely, individual bond hearings, with the Government bearing the burden to show a risk of flight, for those awaiting removal hearings.

In the case before Judge Furman, the detainee has been held for 21 months with no hearing.  In a previous opinion (covered here), Judge Furman concluded that, given the “liberty interests” at stake, it was appropriate for the Government to bear the burden of proof.

While the Board of Immigration Appeals has a policy of putting the burden on the detainee, Judge Carter’s decision yesterday agreed with Judge Furman that the policy was inconsistent with Due Process:
Continue Reading Judges Furman and Carter Grant Habeas Petitions Requiring Individualized Bond Hearings for Detaining Awaiting Removal Hearings

In papers filed yesterday, music mogul Jay Z (Shawn Carter) moved by order to show cause to block a court ordered deposition.  In the underlying suit, the plaintiff claims to be owed compensation for having created the logo for Jay Z’s record label, Roc-A-Fella. Jay Z argues that, despite the court having earlier ordered the deposition for this week, discovery has since confirmed that he would have no relevant knowledge, and that the deposition would be purely for harassment:
Continue Reading Jay Z Moves to Block Court-Ordered Deposition in Suit Over Roc-A-Fella Logo

In an order dated Friday, Judge Carter dismissed Louis Vuitton’s lawsuit against Warner Brothers for allegedly using a knockoff Louis Vuitton handbag in a scene in the movie “Hangover: Part II.” The challenged scene takes place in an airport in Thailand. Stu (Ed Helms) makes room on an airport seat by moving aside the handbag of Alan (Zach Galifianakis), prompting Alan to say: “Careful that is . . . that is a Lewis Vuitton.” Louis Vuitton claimed the bag was actually a knockoff “Diophy” bag, but Judge Carter concluded that allegation was insufficient to state a claim under the Lanham Act or related state law theories because there was no plausible likelihood of consumer confusion:
Continue Reading Judge Carter Dismisses Louis Vuitton’s Challenge to Use of Knockoff Handbag in “Hangover: Part II” Movie